Dietary and 24-h fat oxidation in Asians and whites who differ in body composition.

S.N. Wulan, K.R. Westerterp, G. Plasqui

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: With the same BMI, age, and sex, Asians were reported to have a higher body fat percentage than whites. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the difference in body composition and its effect on dietary and 24-h fat oxidation between Asians and whites when they were fed a diet that contained 30% of energy as fat. DESIGN: Seventeen Asians (8 men) were matched with 17 whites (8 men) for BMI, age, and sex. Physical activity was measured for 7 d with an accelerometer. During the last 3 d of the activity measurement, subjects were given a diet to maintain energy balances. Energy expenditure and substrate use were measured for 24 h in a respiration chamber. Dietary fat oxidation was determined from the percentage recovery of deuterium in the urine after a breakfast meal that contained deuterated palmitic acid. Body composition was calculated with a 3-compartment model from body mass, body volume (hydrodensitometry), and total body water (deuterium dilution). RESULTS: Asians had 5% higher body fat than that of whites (28.1 +/- 7.3% compared with 23.0 +/- 6.9%, respectively; P = 0.03). The fat-free mass index tended to be lower in Asians than in whites (16.3 +/- 1.6 compared with 17.0 +/- 1.7 kg/m(2), respectively; P = 0.07). Dietary fat oxidation as a percentage of fat consumed was 11.7 +/- 3.6% compared with 10.8 +/- 4.5% (P = 0.50) for Asians and whites, respectively. In Asians and whites, the 24-h fat oxidation as a percentage of total energy expenditure was 17.7 +/- 6.9% compared with 19.2 +/- 5.1% (P = 0.63), respectively; carbohydrate oxidation was 68.0 +/- 6.8% compared with 66.1 +/- 5.1% (P = 0.51), respectively; and protein oxidation was 14.3 +/- 2.2 compared with 14.7 +/- 1.6% (P = 0.61), respectively. CONCLUSION: Dietary and 24-h fat oxidation were not different between Asians and whites despite differences in body composition. This study was registered in the public trial registry at www.ccmo.nl as NL31217.068.10.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1335-1341
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume95
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

Keywords

  • RESTING ENERGY-EXPENDITURE
  • MASS INDEX
  • PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
  • ETHNIC-GROUPS
  • OBESE WOMEN
  • WEIGHT-GAIN
  • METABOLISM
  • CARBOHYDRATE
  • CHILDREN
  • BALANCE

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