Developmental progression in performance evaluations: Effects of children's cue-utilization and self-protection

Mariette van Loon*, Nesrin Destan, Manuela A. Spiess, Anique de Bruin, Claudia M. Roebers

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

10 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

To effectively self-regulate learning, children need to self-evaluate whether they meet learning goals. Unfortunately, self-evaluations are often inaccurate, typically, children are overconfident. We investigated two explanations for developmental progression in self-evaluations related to children's (48 5/6 year-olds and 53 7/8-year-olds) interpretations of performance: Improved reliance on item difficulty, and reduced sensitivity to self-protection biases. Self-evaluations were more accurate for 7/8-year-olds than for 5/6-year-olds. There was no developmental increase in reliance on item difficulty; even 5/6-year-olds made adaptive use of this cue. Both age groups were overconfident for incorrect responses, but were able to use performance feedback to improve confidence judgments. However, when self-rewarding, 5/6 year-olds were less likely to take negative performance feedback into account than 7/8-year-olds. The 5/6-year-olds were able to base confidence judgments on performance feedback, but did not use feedback to the same extent when self-rewarding. This may indicate that self-protective biases are an important cause of overconfidence in children. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-60
Number of pages14
JournalLearning and Instruction
Volume51
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2017

Keywords

  • Confidence judgments
  • Self-reward
  • Children
  • Development
  • Overconfidence
  • METACOGNITIVE JUDGMENTS
  • SPONTANEOUS ALLOCATION
  • ADAPTIVE NATURE
  • EARLY-CHILDHOOD
  • YOUNG-CHILDREN
  • EVENT RECALL
  • MEMORY TASK
  • ACCURACY
  • STUDENTS
  • UNCERTAINTY

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