Deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease: better balanced through consideration of the psychosocial consequences

Annelien A Duits, Marten Munneke, Carla J Aalderink, Mark L Kuijf, Bastiaan R Bloem, Rianne A J Esselink

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Abstract

Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an effective intervention for Parkinson's disease if drug therapy with dopaminergic medication has become insufficient. Current post-operative care focuses on optimizing the neurostimulator in combination with medication. We believe that the success rate of DBS surgery can be enhanced if more attention is paid to the (psychosocial) adjustment problems of patients and their families. Finding a new balance after surgery, in the relationship, family and work, is not easy and can be complicated by postoperative non-motor changes. Care for psychosocial adjustment may improve the quality of life and as such increase the overall outcome after surgery. We present two cases to illustrate these psychosocial adjustment problems. One case describes the impact of stimulation-related behavioural changes on relationships, while the other case describes difficulties in resuming work despite successful surgery. Psychosocial support appeared helpful for both cases to find their new balance in life.

Translated title of the contributionDeep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease: better balanced through consideration of the psychosocial consequences
Original languageDutch
Article numberD3838
JournalNederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde
Volume163
Publication statusPublished - 6 Aug 2019

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