Deep brain stimulation in dementia-related disorders

S. Hescham, L.W. Lim, A. Jahanshahi, A. Blokland, Y. Temel

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Memory loss is the key symptom of dementia-related disorders, including the prevalent Alzheimer's disease (AD). To date, pharmacological treatments for AD have limited and short-lasting effects. Therefore, researchers are investigating novel therapies such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat memory impairment and to reduce or stop the progression of it. Clinical and preclinical studies have been performed and stimulations of the fornix, entorhinal cortex and nucleus basalis of Meynert have been carried out. The results of these studies suggest that DBS has the potential to enhance memory functions in patients and animal models. The mechanisms underlying memory enhancement may include the release of specific neurotransmitters and neuroplasticity. Some authors suggest that DBS might even be disease-modifying. Nevertheless, it is still premature to conclude that DBS can be used in the treatment of AD, and the field will wait for the results of ongoing clinical trials.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2666-2675
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume37
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Memory
  • Neuroanatomy
  • Fornix
  • Entorhinal cortex
  • Hippocampus
  • Nucleus basalis of Meynert
  • Limbic system
  • Deep brain stimulation
  • Papez circuit
  • ANTEROGRADE OBJECT-RECOGNITION
  • TREATMENT-RESISTANT DEPRESSION
  • ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX
  • LONG-TERM POTENTIATION
  • ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
  • SPATIAL MEMORY
  • SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS
  • ENTORHINAL CORTEX
  • ELECTRICAL-STIMULATION
  • WORKING-MEMORY

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