Dealing with a life changing event: The influence of spirituality and coping style on quality of life after survival of a cardiac arrest or myocardial infarction

E M Wachelder, V.R.M.P. Moulaert, C van Heugten, Antonius Gorgels, D T Wade, J A Verbunt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Survivors of a cardiac arrest often have cognitive and emotional problems. As a cardiac arrest is also an obvious life-threatening event, other psychological sequelae associated with surviving such as spirituality may also affect quality of life.

OBJECTIVES: To determine the relationship between spirituality, coping and quality of life in cardiac patients both with and without a cardiac arrest.

METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, participants received a questionnaire by post. The primary outcome measure was quality of life (LiSat-9). Secondary outcome measures were spiritual well-being (FACIT-Sp12), coping style (UPCC), emotional well-being (HADS, IES), fatigue (FSS) and daily activities (FAI). Statistical analyses included multiple regression analyses.

RESULTS: Data were available from 72 (60% response rate) cardiac arrest survivors and 98 (47%) patients with a myocardial infarction. Against our hypothesis, there were no differences in spirituality or other variables between the groups, with the exception of more depressive symptoms in patients with myocardial infarction without arrest. Analysis of the total data set (170 participants) found that a better quality of life was associated with higher levels of meaning and peace in life, higher levels of social and leisure activities, and lower levels of fatigue.

CONCLUSIONS: Quality of life after a cardiac arrest and after a myocardial infarction without arrest are not different; fatigue, a sense of meaning and peace, and level of extended daily activities are factors related to higher life satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-86
Number of pages6
JournalResuscitation
Volume109
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

Keywords

  • Heart arrest
  • Quality of life
  • Spirituality
  • FOLLOW-UP
  • COGNITIVE FUNCTION
  • HEART-FAILURE
  • HEALTH
  • SCALE
  • DEPRESSION
  • RELIGION
  • IMPACT
  • CANCER

Cite this

@article{cf84b5acddf74216ba17f6775feb514a,
title = "Dealing with a life changing event: The influence of spirituality and coping style on quality of life after survival of a cardiac arrest or myocardial infarction",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Survivors of a cardiac arrest often have cognitive and emotional problems. As a cardiac arrest is also an obvious life-threatening event, other psychological sequelae associated with surviving such as spirituality may also affect quality of life.OBJECTIVES: To determine the relationship between spirituality, coping and quality of life in cardiac patients both with and without a cardiac arrest.METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, participants received a questionnaire by post. The primary outcome measure was quality of life (LiSat-9). Secondary outcome measures were spiritual well-being (FACIT-Sp12), coping style (UPCC), emotional well-being (HADS, IES), fatigue (FSS) and daily activities (FAI). Statistical analyses included multiple regression analyses.RESULTS: Data were available from 72 (60{\%} response rate) cardiac arrest survivors and 98 (47{\%}) patients with a myocardial infarction. Against our hypothesis, there were no differences in spirituality or other variables between the groups, with the exception of more depressive symptoms in patients with myocardial infarction without arrest. Analysis of the total data set (170 participants) found that a better quality of life was associated with higher levels of meaning and peace in life, higher levels of social and leisure activities, and lower levels of fatigue.CONCLUSIONS: Quality of life after a cardiac arrest and after a myocardial infarction without arrest are not different; fatigue, a sense of meaning and peace, and level of extended daily activities are factors related to higher life satisfaction.",
keywords = "Heart arrest, Quality of life, Spirituality, FOLLOW-UP, COGNITIVE FUNCTION, HEART-FAILURE, HEALTH, SCALE, DEPRESSION, RELIGION, IMPACT, CANCER",
author = "Wachelder, {E M} and V.R.M.P. Moulaert and {van Heugten}, C and Antonius Gorgels and Wade, {D T} and Verbunt, {J A}",
note = "Copyright {\^A}{\circledC} 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.",
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language = "English",
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Dealing with a life changing event : The influence of spirituality and coping style on quality of life after survival of a cardiac arrest or myocardial infarction. / Wachelder, E M; Moulaert, V.R.M.P.; van Heugten, C; Gorgels, Antonius; Wade, D T; Verbunt, J A.

In: Resuscitation, Vol. 109, 12.2016, p. 81-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dealing with a life changing event

T2 - The influence of spirituality and coping style on quality of life after survival of a cardiac arrest or myocardial infarction

AU - Wachelder, E M

AU - Moulaert, V.R.M.P.

AU - van Heugten, C

AU - Gorgels, Antonius

AU - Wade, D T

AU - Verbunt, J A

N1 - Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

PY - 2016/12

Y1 - 2016/12

N2 - BACKGROUND: Survivors of a cardiac arrest often have cognitive and emotional problems. As a cardiac arrest is also an obvious life-threatening event, other psychological sequelae associated with surviving such as spirituality may also affect quality of life.OBJECTIVES: To determine the relationship between spirituality, coping and quality of life in cardiac patients both with and without a cardiac arrest.METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, participants received a questionnaire by post. The primary outcome measure was quality of life (LiSat-9). Secondary outcome measures were spiritual well-being (FACIT-Sp12), coping style (UPCC), emotional well-being (HADS, IES), fatigue (FSS) and daily activities (FAI). Statistical analyses included multiple regression analyses.RESULTS: Data were available from 72 (60% response rate) cardiac arrest survivors and 98 (47%) patients with a myocardial infarction. Against our hypothesis, there were no differences in spirituality or other variables between the groups, with the exception of more depressive symptoms in patients with myocardial infarction without arrest. Analysis of the total data set (170 participants) found that a better quality of life was associated with higher levels of meaning and peace in life, higher levels of social and leisure activities, and lower levels of fatigue.CONCLUSIONS: Quality of life after a cardiac arrest and after a myocardial infarction without arrest are not different; fatigue, a sense of meaning and peace, and level of extended daily activities are factors related to higher life satisfaction.

AB - BACKGROUND: Survivors of a cardiac arrest often have cognitive and emotional problems. As a cardiac arrest is also an obvious life-threatening event, other psychological sequelae associated with surviving such as spirituality may also affect quality of life.OBJECTIVES: To determine the relationship between spirituality, coping and quality of life in cardiac patients both with and without a cardiac arrest.METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, participants received a questionnaire by post. The primary outcome measure was quality of life (LiSat-9). Secondary outcome measures were spiritual well-being (FACIT-Sp12), coping style (UPCC), emotional well-being (HADS, IES), fatigue (FSS) and daily activities (FAI). Statistical analyses included multiple regression analyses.RESULTS: Data were available from 72 (60% response rate) cardiac arrest survivors and 98 (47%) patients with a myocardial infarction. Against our hypothesis, there were no differences in spirituality or other variables between the groups, with the exception of more depressive symptoms in patients with myocardial infarction without arrest. Analysis of the total data set (170 participants) found that a better quality of life was associated with higher levels of meaning and peace in life, higher levels of social and leisure activities, and lower levels of fatigue.CONCLUSIONS: Quality of life after a cardiac arrest and after a myocardial infarction without arrest are not different; fatigue, a sense of meaning and peace, and level of extended daily activities are factors related to higher life satisfaction.

KW - Heart arrest

KW - Quality of life

KW - Spirituality

KW - FOLLOW-UP

KW - COGNITIVE FUNCTION

KW - HEART-FAILURE

KW - HEALTH

KW - SCALE

KW - DEPRESSION

KW - RELIGION

KW - IMPACT

KW - CANCER

U2 - 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2016.09.025

DO - 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2016.09.025

M3 - Article

C2 - 27737773

VL - 109

SP - 81

EP - 86

JO - Resuscitation

JF - Resuscitation

SN - 0300-9572

ER -