Cost-effectiveness of strontium ranelate in the treatment of male osteoporosis

M. Hiligsmann*, W. Ben Sedrine, O. Bruyere, J. -Y. Reginster

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

8 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

The results of this study suggest that, under the assumption of same relative risk reduction of fractures in men as for women, strontium ranelate could be considered a cost-effective strategy compared with no treatment for the treatment of osteoporotic men from a Belgian healthcare payer perspective. This study was conducted to estimate the cost-effectiveness of strontium ranelate in the treatment of osteoporotic men. A previously validated Markov microsimulation model was adapted to estimate the cost (a,not sign2,010) per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained of strontium ranelate compared with no treatment. Similar efficacy data on lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) between men with osteoporosis at high risk of fracture (MALEO Trial) and postmenopausal osteoporotic women (pivotal SOTI, TROPOS trials) supports the assumption, in the base-case analysis, of the same relative risk reduction of fractures in men as for women. Analyses were conducted, from a Belgian healthcare payer perspective, in the population from the MALEO Trial who is a men population with a mean age of 73 years, and BMD T-score a parts per thousand currency signa'2.5 or prevalent vertebral fracture (PVF). In the MALEO population, strontium ranelate compared with no treatment was estimated at a,not sign49,798 and a,not sign25,584 per QALY gained using efficacy data from the intent-to-treat analysis and the per-protocol analysis including only adherent patients, respectively. In men with a BMD T-score a parts per thousand currency signa'2.5 or with PVF, the cost per QALY gained of strontium ranelate fall below thresholds of a,not sign45,000 and a,not sign25,000 per QALY gained based on efficacy data from the entire population of the clinical trial and from the per-protocol analyses, respectively. The results of this study suggest that, under the assumption of same relative risk reduction of fractures in men as for women, strontium ranelate could be considered cost-effective compared with no treatment for male osteoporosis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2291-2300
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume24
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013

Keywords

  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Fractures
  • Men
  • Osteoporosis
  • Strontium ranelate

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