Contraception after pregnancy

Anna Glasier*, Siladitya Bhattacharya, Hans Evers, Kristina Gemzell-Danielsson, Sarah Hardman, Oskari Heikinheimo, Carlo La Vecchia, Edgardo Somigliana, David T. Baird, Piergiorgio Crosignani, Eva Negri, Annibale Volpe, The Annual Capri Workshop Group

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Citation (Web of Science)

Abstract

Whatever the outcome, pregnancy provides the opportunity to offer effective contraception to couples motivated to avoid another pregnancy. This narrative review summarizes the evidence for health providers, drawing attention to current guidelines on which contraceptive methods can be used, and when they should be started after pregnancy, whatever its outcome. Fertility returns within 1 month of the end of pregnancy unless breastfeeding occurs. Breastfeeding, which itself suppresses fertility after childbirth, influences both when contraception should start and what methods can be used. Without breastfeeding, effective contraception should be started as soon as possible if another pregnancy is to be avoided. Interpregnancy intervals of at least 6 months after miscarriage and 1-2 years after childbirth have long been recommended by the World Health Organization in order to reduce the chance of adverse pregnancy outcome. Recent research suggests that this may not be necessary, at least for healthy women

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1378-1385
Number of pages8
JournalActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
Volume98
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

Keywords

  • childbirth
  • contraception
  • ectopic
  • gestational trophoblastic disease
  • induced abortion
  • miscarriage
  • pregnancy
  • MEDICAL ABORTION
  • ECTOPIC PREGNANCY
  • POSTPARTUM CONTRACEPTION
  • INTERPREGNANCY INTERVAL
  • UNINTENDED PREGNANCY
  • INTRAUTERINE SYSTEM
  • DELAYED INSERTION
  • WOMEN
  • IMMEDIATE
  • DELIVERY

Cite this