Consumption of alcoholic beverages and cognitive decline at middle age: the Doetinchem Cohort Study

Astrid C. J. Nooyens*, H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Boukje M. van Gelder, Martin P. J. van Boxtel, W. M. Monique Verschuren

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

21 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Accelerated cognitive decline increases the risk of dementia. Slowing down the rate of cognitive decline leads to the preservation of cognitive functioning in the elderly, who can live independently for a longer time. Alcohol consumption may influence the rate of cognitive decline. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the associations between the total consumption of alcoholic beverages and different types of alcoholic beverages and cognitive decline at middle age. In 2613 men and women of the Doetinchem Cohort Study, aged 43-70 years at baseline (1995-2002), cognitive function (global cognitive function and the domains memory, speed and flexibility) was assessed twice, with a 5-year time interval. In linear regression analyses, the consumption of different types of alcoholic beverages was analysed in relation to cognitive decline, adjusting for confounders. We observed that, in women, the total consumption of alcoholic beverages was inversely associated with the decline in global cognitive function over a 5-year period (P for trend=0.02), while no association was observed in men. Regarding the consumption of different types of alcoholic beverages in men and women together, red wine consumption was inversely associated with the decline in global cognitive function (P for trend
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)715-723
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume111
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Feb 2014

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Cognitive decline
  • Cohort studies
  • Middle age

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