Comorbidity clusters in patients with moderate-to-severe OSA

D. Testelmans*, M.A. Spruit, B. Vrijsen, M. Sastry, C. Belge, A. Kalkanis, S. Gaffron, E.F.M. Wouters, B. Buyse

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Purpose Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent and multifaceted disease. To date, the presence and severity of objectively identified comorbidities and their association with specific OSA phenotypes, CPAP adherence, and survival remain to be elucidated. The aim of this study is to cluster patients with OSA based on 10 clinically important objectively identified comorbidities, and to characterize the comorbidity clusters in terms of clinical and polysomnographic characteristics, CPAP adherence, and survival. Study design and methods Seven hundred ten consecutive patients starting CPAP for moderate-to-severe OSA were included. Comorbidities were based on generally accepted cutoffs identified in the peer-reviewed literature. Self-organizing maps were used to order patients based on presence and severity of their comorbidities and to generate clusters. Results The majority of patients were men (80%). They were generally middle-aged (52 years) and obese (BMI: 31.5 kg/m(2)). Mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 41 +/- 20 per h of sleep. More than 94% of the patients had one or more comorbidities with arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity being the most prevalent. Nine comorbidity clusters were identified. The clinical relevance of these comorbidity clusters was highlighted by the difference in symptoms, PSG parameters, and cardiovascular risk. Also, differences in CPAP adherence, improvements in ESS, and long-term survival were present between the clusters. Conclusion Comorbidity prevalence in patients with OSA is high, and different comorbidity clusters, demonstrating differences in cardiovascular risk, CPAP adherence, and survival, can be identified. These results further substantiate the need for a comprehensive assessment of patients with OSA beyond the AHI.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-204
Number of pages10
JournalSleep and Breathing
Volume26
Issue number1
Early online date3 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2022

Keywords

  • Sleep apnea
  • Comorbidity
  • CPAP
  • Cluster analysis

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