Combining computer modelling and cardiac imaging to understand right ventricular pump function

John Walmsley, Wouter van Everdingen, Maarten J. Cramer, Frits W. Prinzen, Tammo Delhaas, Joost Lumens*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journal(Systematic) Review article peer-review

10 Citations (Web of Science)
21 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction is a strong predictor of outcome in heart failure and is a key determinant of exercise capacity. Despite these crucial findings, the RV remains understudied in the clinical, experimental, and computer modelling literature. This review outlines how recent advances in using computer modelling and cardiac imaging synergistically help to understand RV function in health and disease. We begin by highlighting the complexity of interactions that make modelling the RV both challenging and necessary, and then summarize the multiscale modelling approaches used to date to simulate RV pump function in the context of these interactions. We go on to demonstrate how these modelling approaches in combination with cardiac imaging have improved understanding of RV pump function in pulmonary arterial hypertension, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, dyssynchronous heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and repaired tetralogy of Fallot. We conclude with a perspective on key issues to be addressed by computational models of the RV in the near future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1486-1498
Number of pages13
JournalCardiovascular Research
Volume113
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2017

Keywords

  • Pulmonary arterial hypertension
  • Cardiac resynchronization therapy
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy
  • Congenital heart disease
  • CircAdapt
  • PULMONARY ARTERIAL-HYPERTENSION
  • HYPOPLASTIC LEFT-HEART
  • CHRONIC PRESSURE-OVERLOAD
  • MAGNETIC-RESONANCE
  • RESYNCHRONIZATION THERAPY
  • SEPTAL MOTION
  • EJECTION FRACTION
  • BLALOCK-TAUSSIG
  • BLOOD-FLOW
  • FAILURE

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