CHANGES IN WORKING TIME ARRANGEMENTS OVER TIME AS A CONSEQUENCE OF WORK-FAMILY CONFLICT

Nicole W. H. Jansen*, Danielle C. L. Mohren, Ludovic G. P. M. van Amelsvoort, Nathalie Janssen, IJmert Kant

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Existing longitudinal studies on the relationship between working time arrangements (WTA) and work-family conflict have mainly focused on the normal causal relationship, that is, the impact of WTA on work-family conflict over time. So far, however, the reversed relationship, that is, the effect of work-family conflict on adjustments in WTA over time, has hardly been studied. Because work-family conflict is highly prevalent in the working population, further insight in this reverse relationship is invaluable to gain insight into secondary selection processes. The aim of this study is to investigate whether work-family conflict is prospectively related to adjustments in work schedules, working hours, and overtime work, and to explore sex differences and different time lags in this relation. Data of the prospective Maastricht Cohort Study were used. To study the effect of work-family conflict on a change from shift-to day work over 32 months of follow-up, male three-shift (n = 727), five-shift (n = 932), and irregular-shift (n = 451) workers were selected. To study effects of work-family conflict on reduction of working hours over 12 and 24 months of follow-up, respectively, only day workers (males and females) were selected, capturing 5809 full-time workers (= 36 h/wk) and 1387 part-time workers (
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1045-1061
JournalChronobiology International
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Work-family conflict
  • Working time arrangements
  • Shiftwork
  • Part-time work
  • Sex differences

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