Change in Mortality of Generalized Convulsive Status Epilepticus in High-Income Countries Over Time: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Aidan Neligan*, Alastair John Noyce, Tushar Divakar Gosavi, Simon D. Shorvon, Sebastian Köhler, Matthew C. Walker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

37 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Key PointsQuestionHas the mortality associated with convulsive status epilepticus (SE) changed over time? FindingsThis systematic review and meta-analysis of 61 SE studies conducted between 1990 and 2017 did not demonstrate definitive evidence of improved SE prognosis over time. MeaningChanges in definition and treatment approaches in high-income countries have not been significantly associated with the mortality of convulsive status epilepticus.

ImportanceStatus epilepticus (SE) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Since the late 1990s, a more aggressive management of prolonged convulsive seizures lasting longer than 5 minutes has been advocated. ObjectiveTo determine if convulsive SE mortality has decreased during a time of increasing advocacy for out-of-hospital treatment and escalating and earlier treatment protocols for prolonged seizures and SE. Data SourceThis systemic review and meta-analysis on studies focused on the mortality of convulsive status epilepticus was conducted by searching MEDLINE, Embase, PsychINFO, CINAHL Plus, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews between January 1, 1990, and June 30, 2017. Study SelectionStudies were excluded if they had fewer than 30 participants (

This systematic review and meta-analysis examines the change in convulsive status epilepticus-associated mortality among studies of adults and children in 17 countries..

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)897-905
Number of pages9
JournalJAMA Neurology
Volume76
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019

Keywords

  • REFRACTORY STATUS EPILEPTICUS
  • PROGNOSTIC-FACTORS
  • EARLY PREDICTORS
  • ADULTS
  • CHILDREN
  • EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • INFECTIONS
  • MANAGEMENT
  • MORBIDITY
  • IMPACT

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