Cannabis and tolerance: acute drug impairment as a function of cannabis use history

J G Ramaekers, J H van Wel, D B Spronk, S W Toennes, K P C Kuypers, E L Theunissen, R J Verkes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
139 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Cannabis use history as predictor of neurocognitive response to cannabis intoxication remains subject to scientific and policy debates. The present study assessed the influence of cannabis on neurocognition in cannabis users whose cannabis use history ranged from infrequent to daily use. Drug users (N = 122) received acute doses of cannabis (300 μg/kg THC), cocaine HCl (300 mg) and placebo. Cocaine served as active control for demonstrating neurocognitive test sensitivity. Executive function, impulse control, attention, psychomotor function and subjective intoxication were significantly worse after cannabis administration relative to placebo. Cocaine improved psychomotor function and attention, impaired impulse control and increased feelings of intoxication. Acute effects of cannabis and cocaine on neurocognitive performance were similar across cannabis users irrespective of their cannabis use history. Absence of tolerance implies that that frequent cannabis use and intoxication can be expected to interfere with neurocognitive performance in many daily environments such as school, work or traffic.

Original languageEnglish
Article number26843
Number of pages8
JournalScientific Reports
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 May 2016

Keywords

  • SMOKED MARIJUANA
  • ORAL DELTA(9)-TETRAHYDROCANNABINOL
  • PSYCHOMOTOR PERFORMANCE
  • THC INTOXICATION
  • MOTOR CONTROL
  • HEAVY
  • FREQUENT
  • MARIHUANA
  • RESPONSES
  • COCAINE

Cite this

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title = "Cannabis and tolerance: acute drug impairment as a function of cannabis use history",
abstract = "Cannabis use history as predictor of neurocognitive response to cannabis intoxication remains subject to scientific and policy debates. The present study assessed the influence of cannabis on neurocognition in cannabis users whose cannabis use history ranged from infrequent to daily use. Drug users (N = 122) received acute doses of cannabis (300 μg/kg THC), cocaine HCl (300 mg) and placebo. Cocaine served as active control for demonstrating neurocognitive test sensitivity. Executive function, impulse control, attention, psychomotor function and subjective intoxication were significantly worse after cannabis administration relative to placebo. Cocaine improved psychomotor function and attention, impaired impulse control and increased feelings of intoxication. Acute effects of cannabis and cocaine on neurocognitive performance were similar across cannabis users irrespective of their cannabis use history. Absence of tolerance implies that that frequent cannabis use and intoxication can be expected to interfere with neurocognitive performance in many daily environments such as school, work or traffic.",
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author = "Ramaekers, {J G} and {van Wel}, {J H} and Spronk, {D B} and Toennes, {S W} and Kuypers, {K P C} and Theunissen, {E L} and Verkes, {R J}",
year = "2016",
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doi = "10.1038/srep26843",
language = "English",
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journal = "Scientific Reports",
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Cannabis and tolerance : acute drug impairment as a function of cannabis use history. / Ramaekers, J G; van Wel, J H; Spronk, D B; Toennes, S W; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Verkes, R J.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 6, 26843, 26.05.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Ramaekers, J G

AU - van Wel, J H

AU - Spronk, D B

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AU - Kuypers, K P C

AU - Theunissen, E L

AU - Verkes, R J

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