Can individual cognitions, self-regulation and environmental variables explain educational differences in vegetable consumption?: a cross-sectional study among Dutch adults

L. Springvloet, L. Lechner, A. Oenema

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40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Educational differences in health-related behaviors, where low-and moderate-educated individuals have poorer outcomes than high-educated individuals, are persistent. The reasons for these differences remain poorly understood. This study explored whether individual cognitions, self-regulation and environmental-level factors may explain educational differences in vegetable consumption.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,342 Dutch adults, of whom 54.5% were low/moderate-educated. Individuals completed an online questionnaire, assessing education, vegetable consumption, demographics, individual cognitions (attitude towards consuming 200 grams of vegetables a day, self-efficacy, subjective norm, intention, perception of vegetables as being expensive), self-regulation (general self-regulation, vegetable-specific action-and coping planning) and environmental-level factors (perception of availability of vegetables in the supermarket and availability of vegetables at home). The joint-significance test was used to determine significant mediation effects.

Results: Low/moderate-educated individuals consumed less vegetables (M = 151.2) than high-educated individuals (M = 168.1, beta = -0.15, P <.001). Attitude and availability of vegetables at home were found to partially mediate the association between education and vegetable consumption (percentage mediated effect: 24.46%).

Discussion: Since attitude and availability of vegetables at home partially explain the difference in vegetable consumption between low/moderate- and high-educated individuals, these variables may be good target points for interventions to promote vegetable consumption among low/moderate-educated individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Article number149
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Dec 2014

Keywords

  • Vegetable consumption
  • Socio-economic status
  • Individual cognitions
  • Self-regulation
  • Physical environmental factors
  • SOCIOECONOMIC DIFFERENCES
  • FRUIT
  • NUTRITION
  • BEHAVIOR
  • QUESTIONNAIRE
  • INTERVENTION
  • INEQUALITIES
  • ADOLESCENTS
  • MEDIATION
  • EFFICACY

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