Building blocks for future detectors: Silicon test masses and 1550 nm laser light

R. Schnabel*, M. Britzger, F. Bruckner, O. Burmeister, K. Danzmann, J. Duck, T. Eberle, D. Friedrich, H. Luck, M. Mehmet, R. Nawrodt, S. Steinlechner, B. Willke, Z. Marka, S. Marka

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperAcademic

14 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Current interferometric gravitational wave detectors use the combination of quasi-monochromatic, continuous-wave laser light at 1064 nm and fused silica test masses at room temperature. Detectors of the third generation, such as the Einstein-Telescope, will involve a considerable sensitivity increase. The combination of 1550 nm laser radiation and crystalline silicon test masses at low temperatures might be important ingredients in order to achieve the sensitivity goal. Here we compare some properties of the fused silica and silicon test mass materials relevant for decreasing the thermal noise in future detectors as well as the recent technology achievements in the preparation of laser radiation at 1064 nm and 1550 nm relevant for decreasing the quantum noise. We conclude that silicon test masses and 1550 nm laser light have the potential to form the future building blocks of gravitational wave detection.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE DETECTORS
  • LOW-TEMPERATURES
  • VITREOUS SILICA
  • THERMAL NOISE
  • ABSORPTION
  • COATINGS
  • ANTENNAE

Cite this