Both resistance- and endurance-type exercise reduce the prevalence of hyperglycaemia in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and in insulin-treated and non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients

J.W. van Dijk, R.J.F. Manders, K. Tummers, A.G. Bonomi, C.D.A. Stehouwer, F. Hartgens, L.J.C. van Loon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The present study compares the impact of endurance- vs resistance-type exercise on subsequent 24 h blood glucose homeostasis in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Fifteen individuals with IGT, 15 type 2 diabetic patients treated with exogenous insulin (INS), and 15 type 2 diabetic patients treated with oral glucose-lowering medication (OGLM) participated in a randomised crossover experiment. Participants were studied on three occasions for 3 days under strict dietary standardisation, but otherwise free-living conditions. Blood glucose homeostasis was assessed by ambulatory continuous glucose monitoring over the 24 h period following a 45 min session of resistance-type exercise (75% one repetition maximum), endurance-type exercise (50% maximum workload capacity) or no exercise at all. RESULTS: Average 24 h blood glucose concentrations were reduced from 7.4 +/- 0.2, 9.6 +/- 0.5 and 9.2 +/- 0.7 mmol/l during the control experiment to 6.9 +/- 0.2, 8.6 +/- 0.4 and 8.1 +/- 0.5 mmol/l (resistance-type exercise) and 6.8 +/- 0.2, 8.6 +/- 0.5 and 8.5 +/- 0.5 mmol/l (endurance-type exercise) over the 24 h period following a single bout of exercise in the IGT, OGLM and INS groups, respectively (p < 0.001 for both treatments). The prevalence of hyperglycaemia (blood glucose >10 mmol/l) was reduced by 35 +/- 7 and 33 +/- 11% over the 24 h period following a single session of resistance- and endurance-type exercise, respectively (p < 0.001 for both treatments). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: A single session of resistance- or endurance-type exercise substantially reduces the prevalence of hyperglycaemia during the subsequent 24 h period in individuals with IGT, and in insulin-treated and non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients. Both resistance- and endurance-type exercise can be integrated in exercise intervention programmes designed to improve glycaemic control. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00945165 FUNDING: The Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw, the Netherlands).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1273-1282
Number of pages10
JournalDiabetologia
Volume55
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

Keywords

  • Continuous glucose monitoring
  • Exercise
  • Glycaemic control
  • Postprandial hyperglycaemia
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • POSTPRANDIAL HYPERGLYCEMIA
  • AUTONOMIC FAILURE
  • GLYCEMIC CONTROL
  • OLDER-ADULTS
  • MUSCLE
  • SENSITIVITY
  • TRANSPORT
  • PHOSPHORYLATION
  • COMPLICATIONS
  • STRENGTH

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