Borderline personality disorder traits and affect reactivity to positive affect induction followed by a stressor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Affective hyperreactivity is a core feature of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), yet little is known about reactivity of positive affect (PA). Objectives were to explore the relationship between BPD traits and affect reactivity in response to a personalized PA-induction and a subsequent stressor. Patient status (seeking outpatient treatment for personality-related problems; yes/no), depressive symptoms, and age were examined as alternative predictors of affect reactivity.

METHODS: One hundred and eight females (35 patients) reported on their BPD and depressive symptoms. They completed the Best Possible Self-exercise and a modified Trier Social Stress Task. Trajectories of high and low arousal PA (HAP and LAP) and negative affect (NA) were analyzed with mixed regression modelling.

RESULTS: Patient status (for HAP) and depressive symptoms (for LAP and NA) predicted affect reactivity better than BPD traits. Patients showed a weaker HAP increase after PA-induction, and a similar HAP decrease after the stressor, compared to non-patients. Higher depressive symptoms predicted stronger improvement of LAP and NA after PA-induction, and less pronounced deterioration of LAP and NA after the stressor, relative to baseline.

LIMITATIONS: The sample was a convenience sample amplified with outpatients. Future research should (1) use clinical groups, (2) randomize to neutral vs. PA-induction, and (3) continue to differentiate between HAP and LAP.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results do not support models postulating BPD-specific affective hyperreactivity. HAP and LAP have different trajectories, depending on the degree of psychopathology. The resilience-enhancing potential of a PA-focus in psychotherapy needs further research.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101497
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry
Volume65
Early online date2 Jul 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Positive emotions
  • Borderline personality disorder
  • Depressive symptoms
  • Emotion induction
  • Emotion dysregulation
  • Best possible self
  • MCLEAN SCREENING INSTRUMENT
  • AFFECTIVE INSTABILITY
  • EMOTIONAL REACTIVITY
  • REWARD EXPERIENCE
  • CIRCUMPLEX MODEL
  • NEGATIVE-AFFECT
  • DEPRESSION
  • RESPONSES
  • RESILIENCE
  • HYPERREACTIVITY

Cite this

@article{634b3fb1140b475ab82e06800bba828f,
title = "Borderline personality disorder traits and affect reactivity to positive affect induction followed by a stressor",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Affective hyperreactivity is a core feature of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), yet little is known about reactivity of positive affect (PA). Objectives were to explore the relationship between BPD traits and affect reactivity in response to a personalized PA-induction and a subsequent stressor. Patient status (seeking outpatient treatment for personality-related problems; yes/no), depressive symptoms, and age were examined as alternative predictors of affect reactivity.METHODS: One hundred and eight females (35 patients) reported on their BPD and depressive symptoms. They completed the Best Possible Self-exercise and a modified Trier Social Stress Task. Trajectories of high and low arousal PA (HAP and LAP) and negative affect (NA) were analyzed with mixed regression modelling.RESULTS: Patient status (for HAP) and depressive symptoms (for LAP and NA) predicted affect reactivity better than BPD traits. Patients showed a weaker HAP increase after PA-induction, and a similar HAP decrease after the stressor, compared to non-patients. Higher depressive symptoms predicted stronger improvement of LAP and NA after PA-induction, and less pronounced deterioration of LAP and NA after the stressor, relative to baseline.LIMITATIONS: The sample was a convenience sample amplified with outpatients. Future research should (1) use clinical groups, (2) randomize to neutral vs. PA-induction, and (3) continue to differentiate between HAP and LAP.CONCLUSIONS: Our results do not support models postulating BPD-specific affective hyperreactivity. HAP and LAP have different trajectories, depending on the degree of psychopathology. The resilience-enhancing potential of a PA-focus in psychotherapy needs further research.",
keywords = "Positive emotions, Borderline personality disorder, Depressive symptoms, Emotion induction, Emotion dysregulation, Best possible self, MCLEAN SCREENING INSTRUMENT, AFFECTIVE INSTABILITY, EMOTIONAL REACTIVITY, REWARD EXPERIENCE, CIRCUMPLEX MODEL, NEGATIVE-AFFECT, DEPRESSION, RESPONSES, RESILIENCE, HYPERREACTIVITY",
author = "Nicole Geschwind and {van Breukelen}, Gerard and Jill Lobbestael",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1016/j.jbtep.2019.101497",
language = "English",
volume = "65",
journal = "Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry",
issn = "0005-7916",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Borderline personality disorder traits and affect reactivity to positive affect induction followed by a stressor

AU - Geschwind, Nicole

AU - van Breukelen, Gerard

AU - Lobbestael, Jill

N1 - Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Affective hyperreactivity is a core feature of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), yet little is known about reactivity of positive affect (PA). Objectives were to explore the relationship between BPD traits and affect reactivity in response to a personalized PA-induction and a subsequent stressor. Patient status (seeking outpatient treatment for personality-related problems; yes/no), depressive symptoms, and age were examined as alternative predictors of affect reactivity.METHODS: One hundred and eight females (35 patients) reported on their BPD and depressive symptoms. They completed the Best Possible Self-exercise and a modified Trier Social Stress Task. Trajectories of high and low arousal PA (HAP and LAP) and negative affect (NA) were analyzed with mixed regression modelling.RESULTS: Patient status (for HAP) and depressive symptoms (for LAP and NA) predicted affect reactivity better than BPD traits. Patients showed a weaker HAP increase after PA-induction, and a similar HAP decrease after the stressor, compared to non-patients. Higher depressive symptoms predicted stronger improvement of LAP and NA after PA-induction, and less pronounced deterioration of LAP and NA after the stressor, relative to baseline.LIMITATIONS: The sample was a convenience sample amplified with outpatients. Future research should (1) use clinical groups, (2) randomize to neutral vs. PA-induction, and (3) continue to differentiate between HAP and LAP.CONCLUSIONS: Our results do not support models postulating BPD-specific affective hyperreactivity. HAP and LAP have different trajectories, depending on the degree of psychopathology. The resilience-enhancing potential of a PA-focus in psychotherapy needs further research.

AB - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Affective hyperreactivity is a core feature of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), yet little is known about reactivity of positive affect (PA). Objectives were to explore the relationship between BPD traits and affect reactivity in response to a personalized PA-induction and a subsequent stressor. Patient status (seeking outpatient treatment for personality-related problems; yes/no), depressive symptoms, and age were examined as alternative predictors of affect reactivity.METHODS: One hundred and eight females (35 patients) reported on their BPD and depressive symptoms. They completed the Best Possible Self-exercise and a modified Trier Social Stress Task. Trajectories of high and low arousal PA (HAP and LAP) and negative affect (NA) were analyzed with mixed regression modelling.RESULTS: Patient status (for HAP) and depressive symptoms (for LAP and NA) predicted affect reactivity better than BPD traits. Patients showed a weaker HAP increase after PA-induction, and a similar HAP decrease after the stressor, compared to non-patients. Higher depressive symptoms predicted stronger improvement of LAP and NA after PA-induction, and less pronounced deterioration of LAP and NA after the stressor, relative to baseline.LIMITATIONS: The sample was a convenience sample amplified with outpatients. Future research should (1) use clinical groups, (2) randomize to neutral vs. PA-induction, and (3) continue to differentiate between HAP and LAP.CONCLUSIONS: Our results do not support models postulating BPD-specific affective hyperreactivity. HAP and LAP have different trajectories, depending on the degree of psychopathology. The resilience-enhancing potential of a PA-focus in psychotherapy needs further research.

KW - Positive emotions

KW - Borderline personality disorder

KW - Depressive symptoms

KW - Emotion induction

KW - Emotion dysregulation

KW - Best possible self

KW - MCLEAN SCREENING INSTRUMENT

KW - AFFECTIVE INSTABILITY

KW - EMOTIONAL REACTIVITY

KW - REWARD EXPERIENCE

KW - CIRCUMPLEX MODEL

KW - NEGATIVE-AFFECT

KW - DEPRESSION

KW - RESPONSES

KW - RESILIENCE

KW - HYPERREACTIVITY

U2 - 10.1016/j.jbtep.2019.101497

DO - 10.1016/j.jbtep.2019.101497

M3 - Article

C2 - 31299335

VL - 65

JO - Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry

JF - Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry

SN - 0005-7916

M1 - 101497

ER -