Blood-Based Protein Changes in Childhood Are Associated With Increased Risk for Later Psychotic Disorder: Evidence From a Nested Case-Control Study of the ALSPAC Longitudinal Birth Cohort

Jane A. English, Lorna M. Lopez, Aoife O'Gorman, Melanie Focking, Magdalena Hryniewiecka, Caitriona Scaife, Sophie Sabherwal, Kieran Wynne, Patrick Dicker, Bart P. F. Rutten, Glynn Lewis, Stanley Zammit, Mary Cannon, Gerard Cagney, David R. Cotter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)297-306
Number of pages10
JournalSchizophrenia Bulletin
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

Keywords

  • ALSPAC
  • complement
  • coagulation
  • plasma
  • proteomics
  • psychotic disorder
  • schizophrenia
  • DATA-INDEPENDENT ACQUISITION
  • SCHIZOPHRENIA-PATIENTS
  • MASS-SPECTROMETRY
  • COMPLEMENT
  • PROTEOMICS
  • EXPERIENCES
  • POPULATION
  • SERUM
  • BRAIN
  • IDENTIFICATION

Cite this

English, J. A., Lopez, L. M., O'Gorman, A., Focking, M., Hryniewiecka, M., Scaife, C., Sabherwal, S., Wynne, K., Dicker, P., Rutten, B. P. F., Lewis, G., Zammit, S., Cannon, M., Cagney, G., & Cotter, D. R. (2018). Blood-Based Protein Changes in Childhood Are Associated With Increased Risk for Later Psychotic Disorder: Evidence From a Nested Case-Control Study of the ALSPAC Longitudinal Birth Cohort. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 44(2), 297-306. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbx075