Biomonitoring of tobacco smoke carcinogenicity by dosimetry of DNA adducts and genotyping and phenotyping of biotransformational enzymes: a review on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

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Abstract

Biomonitoring of tobacco smoke carcinogenicity by dosimetry of DNA adducts and genotyping and phenotyping of biotransformational enzymes: a review on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Besarati Nia A, Kleinjans JC, Van Schooten FJ.

Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, 1450 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA 91010-3000, USA. ania@coh.org

In this review article, we summarize the data on tobacco smoke carcinogenicity in relation to DNA adduct dosimetry and genotyping and phenotyping of biotransformational enzymes. A major class of carcinogens, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, present in substantial quantities in tobacco smoke, is discussed. The historical background and an overview of the metabolic pathways are given. The epidemiological and biological data in particular on dosimetry of the representative DNA adducts and genotyping and phenotyping of the respective activating and detoxifying enzymes are presented. The salient findings are highlighted, the uncertainties are underlined and, finally, recommendations for future research are made.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-229
Number of pages21
JournalBiomarkers
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2002

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