Biased Attention to Facial Expressions of Ambiguous Emotions in Borderline Personality Disorder: An Eye-Tracking Study

Deborah Kaiser*, Gitta A. Jacob, Linda van Zutphen, Nicolette Siep, Andreas Sprenger, Brunna Tuschen-Caffier, Alena Senft, Arnoud Arntz, Gregor Domes

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Preliminary evidence suggests that biased attention could be crucial in
fostering the emotion recognition abnormalities in borderline personality
disorder (BPD). We compared BPD patients to Cluster-C personality disorder (CC) patients and non-patients (NP) regarding emotion recognition in
ambiguous faces and their visual attention allocation to the eyes. The role
of comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in BPD regarding emotion recognition and visual attention was explored. BPD patients fixated the
eyes of angry/happy, sad/happy, and fearful/sad blends longer than nonpatients. This visual attention pattern was mainly driven by BPD patients
with PTSD. This subgroup also demonstrated longer fixations than CC
patients and a trend towards longer fixations than BPD patients without
PTSD for the angry/happy and fearful/sad blends. Emotion recognition was
not altered in BPD. Biased visual attention towards the eyes of ambiguous
facial expressions in BPD might be due to trauma-related attentional bias
rather than to impairments in facial emotion recognition.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)671-690
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Personality Disorders
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2019

Keywords

  • borderline personality disorder
  • emotion recognition
  • face perception
  • eye tracking
  • visual attention bias
  • posttraumatic stress disorder
  • STRUCTURED CLINICAL INTERVIEW
  • POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER
  • DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOR-THERAPY
  • CHILDHOOD SEXUAL-ABUSE
  • AXIS-I COMORBIDITY
  • PSYCHOMETRIC EVALUATION
  • RECOGNITION
  • THREAT
  • SENSITIVITY
  • CHILDREN

Cite this

Kaiser, Deborah ; Jacob, Gitta A. ; van Zutphen, Linda ; Siep, Nicolette ; Sprenger, Andreas ; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna ; Senft, Alena ; Arntz, Arnoud ; Domes, Gregor. / Biased Attention to Facial Expressions of Ambiguous Emotions in Borderline Personality Disorder : An Eye-Tracking Study. In: Journal of Personality Disorders. 2019 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 671-690.
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abstract = "Preliminary evidence suggests that biased attention could be crucial infostering the emotion recognition abnormalities in borderline personalitydisorder (BPD). We compared BPD patients to Cluster-C personality disorder (CC) patients and non-patients (NP) regarding emotion recognition inambiguous faces and their visual attention allocation to the eyes. The roleof comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in BPD regarding emotion recognition and visual attention was explored. BPD patients fixated theeyes of angry/happy, sad/happy, and fearful/sad blends longer than nonpatients. This visual attention pattern was mainly driven by BPD patientswith PTSD. This subgroup also demonstrated longer fixations than CCpatients and a trend towards longer fixations than BPD patients withoutPTSD for the angry/happy and fearful/sad blends. Emotion recognition wasnot altered in BPD. Biased visual attention towards the eyes of ambiguousfacial expressions in BPD might be due to trauma-related attentional biasrather than to impairments in facial emotion recognition.",
keywords = "borderline personality disorder, emotion recognition, face perception, eye tracking, visual attention bias, posttraumatic stress disorder, STRUCTURED CLINICAL INTERVIEW, POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER, DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOR-THERAPY, CHILDHOOD SEXUAL-ABUSE, AXIS-I COMORBIDITY, PSYCHOMETRIC EVALUATION, RECOGNITION, THREAT, SENSITIVITY, CHILDREN",
author = "Deborah Kaiser and Jacob, {Gitta A.} and {van Zutphen}, Linda and Nicolette Siep and Andreas Sprenger and Brunna Tuschen-Caffier and Alena Senft and Arnoud Arntz and Gregor Domes",
year = "2019",
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Biased Attention to Facial Expressions of Ambiguous Emotions in Borderline Personality Disorder : An Eye-Tracking Study. / Kaiser, Deborah; Jacob, Gitta A.; van Zutphen, Linda; Siep, Nicolette; Sprenger, Andreas; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Senft, Alena; Arntz, Arnoud; Domes, Gregor.

In: Journal of Personality Disorders, Vol. 33, No. 5, 10.2019, p. 671-690.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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KW - borderline personality disorder

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KW - CHILDREN

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