Behavioral outcomes of a novel, pelvic nerve damage rat model of fecal incontinence

P. T. J. Janssen, S. O. Breukink, J. Melenhorst, L. P. S. Stassen, N. D. Bouvy, Y. Temel, A. Jahanshahi*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

BackgroundFecal incontinence (FI) has a multifactorial pathophysiology with a severe social impact. The most common cause for FI is pudendal nerve damage, which mostly occurs in women during or after labor. A better understanding of the pathophysiology is required to optimize treatment of FI. In this study, we evaluate the use of a novel pelvic nerve damage rat model of FI. MethodsThis new model simulates the forces on the pelvic floor during labor by prolonged transvaginal, retro-uterine intrapelvic balloon distention in female rats. Number of fecal pellets produced per day and defecation pattern was compared between the experimental and control group for 2weeks. The cages of the rats were divided in food, nesting and latrine areas to evaluate changes in defecation pattern. The FI Index (FII) was calculated to assess the ratio of fecal pellets between the non-latrine areas and the total number of pellets. A higher score represents more random distribution of feces outside the latrine area. ResultsTotal number of fecal pellets was higher in the experimental group as compared with the controls. In both groups most fecal pellets were deposited in the nesting area, which is closest to the food area. The experimental group deposited more fecal pellets in the latrine area and had a lower FII indicating less random distribution of feces outside the latrine area. ConclusionTransvaginal, retro-uterine intrapelvic balloon distention is a safe and feasible animal model simulating the human physiologic impact of labor by downwards pressure on the pelvic floor.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13242
Number of pages7
JournalNeurogastroenterology and Motility
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018

Keywords

  • fecal incontinence
  • pelvic nerve damage
  • rat model
  • EXTERNAL ANAL-SPHINCTER
  • SACRAL NEUROMODULATION
  • PUDENDAL NERVE
  • ANIMAL-MODEL
  • DYNAMIC GRACILOPLASTY
  • FUNCTIONAL RECOVERY
  • STIMULATION
  • INNERVATION
  • CONTINENCE
  • CHILDBIRTH

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