Association Between Proxy-or Self-Reported Cognitive Decline and Cognitive Performance in Memory Clinic Visitors

Angelique A. A. Gruters, Inez H. G. B. Ramakers*, Frans R. J. Verhey, Sebastian Köhler, Roy P. C. Kessels, Marjolein E. de Vugt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Background: It is uncertain whether self- and proxy-reported cognitive decline in older adults reflect an actual objective cognitive dysfunction in the clinical sense, and if these are predictive for developing dementia.

Objective: The aim of the present study is to investigate the cross-sectional and longitudinal relation between subjective cognitive decline and objective cognitive performance, depressive symptoms, and to determine the predictive value for development of dementia.

Methods: We included 405 patients without dementia at first visit from the Maastricht memory clinic participating in a longitudinal cohort study. Subjective cognitive decline was measured using a self- and proxy-report questionnaire. All patients underwent a standardized neuropsychological assessment. Follow-up assessments were performed yearly for three consecutive years, and once after five years.

Results: Subjective cognitive decline was associated with lower cognitive performance and more depressive symptoms. When comparing self- (n = 3 42, 84%) and proxy-reported decline (n = 110, 27%), it was shown that proxy reports were associated with a more widespread pattern of lower cognitive performance. In participants without cognitive impairment proxy-reported decline was not associated with depressive symptoms. In contrast, self-reported decline was associated with a stable course of depressive symptoms at follow-up. Proxy-reported cognitive decline (HR =1.76, 95%CI=1.12-2.78), and mutual complaints (HR = 1.73, CI:1.09-2.76) predicted incident dementia while self-reported decline did not reach statistical significance (HR = 1.26, 95%CI=0.65-2.43).

Conclusion: Proxy-reported cognitive decline was consistently associated with lower cognitive performance and conversion to dementia over 5 years. Self-reported cognitive decline in patients without cognitive impairment might indicate underlying depressive symptoms and thus deserve clinical attention as well.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1225-1239
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume70
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • dementia
  • depressive symptoms
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • proxy-report
  • subjective cognitive decline
  • PRECLINICAL ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
  • NORMATIVE DATA
  • DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
  • SIGNIFICANT OTHERS
  • INFORMANT-REPORTS
  • VERBAL FLUENCY
  • SYDNEY MEMORY
  • OLDER-PEOPLE
  • COMPLAINTS
  • IMPAIRMENT

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