Are there effects of age, gender, height, and body fat on the functional muscle-bone unit in children and adults?

I. Duran*, K. Martakis, S. Hamacher, C. Stark, O. Semler, E. Schoenau

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

The aim was to describe the effect of age, gender, height, different stages of human life, and body fat on the functional muscle-bone unit. All these factors had a significant effect on the functional muscle-bone unit and should be addressed when assessing functional muscle-bone unit in children and adults. Introduction For the clinical evaluation of the functional muscle-bone unit, it was proposed to evaluate the adaptation of the bone to the acting forces. A frequently used parameter for this is the total body less head bone mineral content (TBLH-BMC) determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in relation to the lean body mass (LBM by DXA). LBM correlates highly with muscle mass. Therefore, LBM is a surrogate parameter for the muscular forces acting in everyday life. The aim of the study was to describe the effect of age and gender on the TBLH-BMC for LBM and to evaluate the impact of other factors, such as height, different stages of human life, and of body fat. Methods As part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) study, between the years 1999-2006 whole-body DXA scans on randomly selected Americans from 8 years of age were carried out. From all eligible DXA scans (1999-2004), three major US ethnic groups were evaluated (non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks, and Mexican Americans) for further statistical analysis. Results For the statistical analysis, the DXA scans of 8190 non-Hispanic White children and adults (3903 female), of 4931 non-Hispanic Black children and adults (2250 female) and 5421 of Mexican-American children and adults (2424 female) were eligible. Age, gender, body height, and especially body fat had a significant effect on the functional muscle-bone unit. Conclusions When assessing TBLH-BMC for LBM in children and adults, the effects of age, gender, body fat, and body height should be addressed. These effects were analyzed for the first time in such a large cohort.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1069-1079
Number of pages11
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2018

Keywords

  • Adults
  • Bone mineral content
  • Children
  • Functionalmuscle-bone unit
  • Mechanostat
  • Muscle mass
  • X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY
  • MINERAL CONTENT
  • POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN
  • OFFICIAL POSITIONS
  • OLDER WOMEN
  • WHOLE-BODY
  • MASS
  • OSTEOPOROSIS
  • FRACTURES
  • STRENGTH

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