Are there educational differences in the association between self-rated health and mortality in Norway? The HUNT Study

Joakim D. Dalen*, Tim Huijts, Steinar Krokstad, Terje A. Eikemo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this study was to test whether the association between self-rated health and mortality differs between educational groups in Norway, and to examine whether health problems and health-related behaviour can explain any of these differences within a previously unexplored contextual setting.The study used data from the Nord-Tr??ndelag Health Study 84-86 (HUNT) with a 20-year follow up. The analyses were performed for respondents between 25-101 years at baseline (n = 56,788). The association between self-rated health and mortality was tested using Cox regression.The results indicate that although self-rated health is associated with mortality there is no difference in the association between self-rated health and mortality between educational groups. Introducing health-related variables did not have an impact on the result.Given the small educational differences in the association between self-rated health and mortality, this supports the reliability of self-reported health as a measurement for objective health.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)641-647
Number of pages7
JournalScandinavian Journal of Public Health
Volume40
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Self-rated health
  • mortality
  • socioeconomic position
  • education
  • HUNT-Study
  • SOCIOECONOMIC INEQUALITIES
  • SUBSEQUENT MORTALITY
  • EUROPEAN COUNTRIES
  • ASSESSED HEALTH
  • MORBIDITY

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