Antioxidants in Translational Medicine

Harald H. H. W. Schmidt, Roland Stocker, Claudia Vollbracht, Goran Paulsen, Dennis Riley, Andreas Daiber*, Antonio Cuadrado

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Significance: It is generally accepted that reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging molecules or antioxidants exert health-promoting effects and thus their consumption as food additives and nutraceuticals has been greatly encouraged. Antioxidants may be beneficial in situations of subclinical deficiency and increased demand or acutely upon high-dose infusion. However, to date, there is little clinical evidence for the long-term benefit of most antioxidants. Alarmingly, recent evidence points even to health risks, in particular for supplements of lipophilic antioxidants. Recent Advances: The biological impact of ROS depends not only on their quantities but also on their chemical nature, (sub)cellular and tissue location, and the rates of their formation and degradation. Moreover, ROS serve important physiological functions; thus, inappropriate removal of ROS may cause paradoxical reductive stress and thereby induce or promote disease. Critical Issues: Any recommendation on antioxidants must be based on solid clinical evidence and patient-relevant outcomes rather than surrogate parameters. Future Directions: Such evidence-based use may include site-directed application, time-limited high dosing, (functional) pharmacological repair of oxidized biomolecules, and triggers of endogenous antioxidant response systems. Ideally, these approaches need guidance by patient stratification through predictive biomarkers and possibly imaging modalities. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1130-1143.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1130-1143
JournalAntioxidants & Redox Signaling
Volume23
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Nov 2015

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