Antecedents of COVID-19 rumination: A three-wave study

Marjolein C. J. Caniëls*, Irina Nikolova, Isabella Hatak, Petra C. de Weerd-Nederhof

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected nearly every aspect of our lives and has caused a considerable rise in psychological complaints such as anxieties and depression. The majority of studies so far has focused on outcomes of the COVID-19 pandemic. To augment current knowledge, we focus on the antecedents of COVID-19 rumination. Specially, we examine how negative and positive work events prior to the outbreak influence individuals' coping capacity with regard to COVID-19 (i.e., the extent to which individuals have recurrent negative thoughts about COVID-19). Drawing on Conservation of Resources Theory (COR), we maintain that positive and negative work events prior to the pandemic can affect one's self-efficacy experiences and in turn can impact recurrent negative thoughts about COVID-19. Alongside exploring the proposed theoretical mediation model, we test one of the key assumptions of the COR theory: the notion of primacy of negative over positive affect that results from negative (vs. positive) work events. Three-waved data was collected among Dutch employees (T1 = 302; T2 = 199; T3 = 171); two prior to the pandemic and one at the onset of the outbreak. Results showed that positive work events increased self-efficacy, which in turn reduced COVID-19 rumination. Contrary to the expectation of primacy of the effects of negative work events, we found no significant impact of negative work events on individuals' COVID-19 rumination.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)476-483
Number of pages8
JournalScandinavian Journal of Psychology
Volume63
Issue number5
Early online date23 May 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2022

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • positive and negative events
  • rumination
  • self-efficacy
  • work events
  • RESOURCES
  • DEPRESSION
  • SLEEP
  • ANXIETY
  • MODEL
  • SELF-FOCUS
  • RESPONSES
  • POSITIVE EVENTS
  • WORK STRESS
  • SOCIAL SUPPORT

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