Anorectal Chlamydia trachomatis Load Is Similar in Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women Reporting Anal Sex

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background

Anorectal Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia) is frequently diagnosed in men who have sex with men (MSM) and in women, but it is unknown whether these infections are comparable in clinical impact and transmission potential. Quantifying bacterial load and identifying determinants associated with high bacterial load could provide more insight.

Methods

We selected a convenience sample of MSM who reported anal sex (n = 90) and women with concurrent urogenital/anorectal chlamydia who reported anal sex (n = 51) or did not report anal sex (n = 61) from the South Limburg Public Health Service's STI unit. Bacterial load (Chlamydia/ml) was quantified for all samples and log transformed for analyses. Samples with an unquantifiable human leukocyte antigen (n = 9) were excluded from analyses, as they were deemed inadequately sampled.

Results

The mean log anorectal chlamydia load (3.50) was similar for MSM and women who reported having anal sex (3.80, P = 0.21). The anorectal chlamydia load was significantly higher in these groups than in women who did not report having anal sex (2.76, P = 0.001). Detectable load values ranged from 1.81-6.32 chlamydia/ml for MSM, 1.74-7.33 chlamydia/ml for women who reported having anal sex and 1.84-6.31 chlamydia/ml for women who did not report having anal sex. Symptoms and several other determinants were not associated with anorectal chlamydia load.

Conclusions

Women who did not report anal sex had lower anorectal loads, but they were within a similar range to the other two groups. Anorectal chlamydia load was comparable between MSM and women who reported anal sex, suggesting similar transmission potential.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0134991
Number of pages12
JournalPLOS ONE
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Aug 2015

Keywords

  • SEXUALLY-TRANSMITTED INFECTION
  • NEISSERIA-GONORRHOEAE
  • RECTAL CHLAMYDIA
  • PHARYNGEAL CHLAMYDIA
  • PERSISTENCE
  • PREVALENCE
  • SWABS

Cite this

@article{7c2003fbb21b41f2a25343e2c908186f,
title = "Anorectal Chlamydia trachomatis Load Is Similar in Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women Reporting Anal Sex",
abstract = "BackgroundAnorectal Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia) is frequently diagnosed in men who have sex with men (MSM) and in women, but it is unknown whether these infections are comparable in clinical impact and transmission potential. Quantifying bacterial load and identifying determinants associated with high bacterial load could provide more insight.MethodsWe selected a convenience sample of MSM who reported anal sex (n = 90) and women with concurrent urogenital/anorectal chlamydia who reported anal sex (n = 51) or did not report anal sex (n = 61) from the South Limburg Public Health Service's STI unit. Bacterial load (Chlamydia/ml) was quantified for all samples and log transformed for analyses. Samples with an unquantifiable human leukocyte antigen (n = 9) were excluded from analyses, as they were deemed inadequately sampled.ResultsThe mean log anorectal chlamydia load (3.50) was similar for MSM and women who reported having anal sex (3.80, P = 0.21). The anorectal chlamydia load was significantly higher in these groups than in women who did not report having anal sex (2.76, P = 0.001). Detectable load values ranged from 1.81-6.32 chlamydia/ml for MSM, 1.74-7.33 chlamydia/ml for women who reported having anal sex and 1.84-6.31 chlamydia/ml for women who did not report having anal sex. Symptoms and several other determinants were not associated with anorectal chlamydia load.ConclusionsWomen who did not report anal sex had lower anorectal loads, but they were within a similar range to the other two groups. Anorectal chlamydia load was comparable between MSM and women who reported anal sex, suggesting similar transmission potential.",
keywords = "SEXUALLY-TRANSMITTED INFECTION, NEISSERIA-GONORRHOEAE, RECTAL CHLAMYDIA, PHARYNGEAL CHLAMYDIA, PERSISTENCE, PREVALENCE, SWABS",
author = "{van Liere}, G.A.F.S. and J.A.M.C. Dirks and C.J.P.A. Hoebe and P.F. Wolffs and N.H.T.M. Dukers-Muijrers",
year = "2015",
month = "8",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0134991",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "PLOS ONE",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "8",

}

Anorectal Chlamydia trachomatis Load Is Similar in Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women Reporting Anal Sex. / van Liere, G.A.F.S.; Dirks, J.A.M.C.; Hoebe, C.J.P.A.; Wolffs, P.F.; Dukers-Muijrers, N.H.T.M.

In: PLOS ONE, Vol. 10, No. 8, e0134991, 11.08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Anorectal Chlamydia trachomatis Load Is Similar in Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women Reporting Anal Sex

AU - van Liere, G.A.F.S.

AU - Dirks, J.A.M.C.

AU - Hoebe, C.J.P.A.

AU - Wolffs, P.F.

AU - Dukers-Muijrers, N.H.T.M.

PY - 2015/8/11

Y1 - 2015/8/11

N2 - BackgroundAnorectal Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia) is frequently diagnosed in men who have sex with men (MSM) and in women, but it is unknown whether these infections are comparable in clinical impact and transmission potential. Quantifying bacterial load and identifying determinants associated with high bacterial load could provide more insight.MethodsWe selected a convenience sample of MSM who reported anal sex (n = 90) and women with concurrent urogenital/anorectal chlamydia who reported anal sex (n = 51) or did not report anal sex (n = 61) from the South Limburg Public Health Service's STI unit. Bacterial load (Chlamydia/ml) was quantified for all samples and log transformed for analyses. Samples with an unquantifiable human leukocyte antigen (n = 9) were excluded from analyses, as they were deemed inadequately sampled.ResultsThe mean log anorectal chlamydia load (3.50) was similar for MSM and women who reported having anal sex (3.80, P = 0.21). The anorectal chlamydia load was significantly higher in these groups than in women who did not report having anal sex (2.76, P = 0.001). Detectable load values ranged from 1.81-6.32 chlamydia/ml for MSM, 1.74-7.33 chlamydia/ml for women who reported having anal sex and 1.84-6.31 chlamydia/ml for women who did not report having anal sex. Symptoms and several other determinants were not associated with anorectal chlamydia load.ConclusionsWomen who did not report anal sex had lower anorectal loads, but they were within a similar range to the other two groups. Anorectal chlamydia load was comparable between MSM and women who reported anal sex, suggesting similar transmission potential.

AB - BackgroundAnorectal Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia) is frequently diagnosed in men who have sex with men (MSM) and in women, but it is unknown whether these infections are comparable in clinical impact and transmission potential. Quantifying bacterial load and identifying determinants associated with high bacterial load could provide more insight.MethodsWe selected a convenience sample of MSM who reported anal sex (n = 90) and women with concurrent urogenital/anorectal chlamydia who reported anal sex (n = 51) or did not report anal sex (n = 61) from the South Limburg Public Health Service's STI unit. Bacterial load (Chlamydia/ml) was quantified for all samples and log transformed for analyses. Samples with an unquantifiable human leukocyte antigen (n = 9) were excluded from analyses, as they were deemed inadequately sampled.ResultsThe mean log anorectal chlamydia load (3.50) was similar for MSM and women who reported having anal sex (3.80, P = 0.21). The anorectal chlamydia load was significantly higher in these groups than in women who did not report having anal sex (2.76, P = 0.001). Detectable load values ranged from 1.81-6.32 chlamydia/ml for MSM, 1.74-7.33 chlamydia/ml for women who reported having anal sex and 1.84-6.31 chlamydia/ml for women who did not report having anal sex. Symptoms and several other determinants were not associated with anorectal chlamydia load.ConclusionsWomen who did not report anal sex had lower anorectal loads, but they were within a similar range to the other two groups. Anorectal chlamydia load was comparable between MSM and women who reported anal sex, suggesting similar transmission potential.

KW - SEXUALLY-TRANSMITTED INFECTION

KW - NEISSERIA-GONORRHOEAE

KW - RECTAL CHLAMYDIA

KW - PHARYNGEAL CHLAMYDIA

KW - PERSISTENCE

KW - PREVALENCE

KW - SWABS

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0134991

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0134991

M3 - Article

VL - 10

JO - PLOS ONE

JF - PLOS ONE

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 8

M1 - e0134991

ER -