An expertise reversal effect of segmentation in learning from animated worked-out examples

Ingrid A. E. Spanjers*, Pieter Wouters, Tamara van Gog, Jeroen J. G. van Merrienboer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

75 Citations (Web of Science)
55 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Many animations impose a high cognitive load due to the transience of information, which often hampers learning. Segmentation, that is presenting animations in pieces (i.e., segments), has been proposed as a means to reduce this high cognitive load. The expertise reversal effect shows, however, that design measures that have a positive effect on cognitive load and learning for students with lower levels of prior knowledge, might not be effective, or might even have a negative effect on cognitive load and learning for students with higher levels of prior knowledge. This experiment with animated worked-out examples showed an expertise reversal effect of segmentation: segmented animations were more efficient than continuous animations (i.e., equal test performance with lower investment of mental effort during learning) for students with lower levels of prior knowledge, but not for students with higher levels of prior knowledge.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-52
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Instructional animations
  • Cognitive load
  • Segmentation
  • Expertise reversal effect
  • Multimedia learning

Cite this