Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in 9357 Subjects From 11 Populations Highlights Missed Opportunities for Cardiovascular Prevention in Women

Jose Boggia, Lutgarde Thijs, Tine W. Hansen, Yan Li, Masahiro Kikuya, Kristina Bjoerklund-Bodegard, Tom Richart, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Jorgen Jeppesen, Christian Torp-Pedersen, Eamon Dolan, Tatiana Kuznetsova, Agnieszka Olszanecka, Valerie Tikhonoff, Sofia Malyutina, Edoardo Casiglia, Yuri Nikitin, Lars Lind, Gladys E. Maestre, Edgardo SandoyaKalina Kawecka-Jaszcz, Yutaka Imai, Jiguang Wang, Hans Ibsen, Eoin O'Brien, Jan A. Staessen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

To analyze sex-specific relative and absolute risks associated with blood pressure (BP), we performed conventional and 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements in 9357 subjects (mean age, 52.8 years; 47% women) recruited from 11 populations. We computed standardized multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for associations between outcome and systolic BP. During a course of 11.2 years (median), 1245 participants died, 472 of cardiovascular causes. The number of fatal combined with nonfatal events was 1080, 525, and 458 for cardiovascular and cardiac events and for stroke, respectively. In women and men alike, systolic BP predicted outcome, irrespective of the type of BP measurement. Women compared with men were at lower risk (hazard ratios for death and all cardiovascular events=0.66 and 0.62, respectively; P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)397-405
JournalHypertension
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

Keywords

  • blood pressure
  • epidemiology
  • morbidity
  • risk factors
  • women

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