Altered brain network topology during speech tracking in developmental dyslexia

Manli Zhang*, Lars Riecke, Gorka Fraga-González, Milene Bonte

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Developmental dyslexia is often accompanied by altered phonological processing of speech. Underlying neural changes have typically been characterized in terms of stimulus- and/or task-related responses within individual brain regions or their functional connectivity. Less is known about potential changes in the more global functional organization of brain networks. Here we recorded electroencephalography (EEG) in typical and dyslexic readers while they listened to (a) a random sequence of syllables and (b) a series of tri-syllabic real words. The network topology of the phase synchronization of evoked cortical oscillations was investigated in four frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha and beta) using minimum spanning tree graphs. We found that, compared to syllable tracking, word tracking triggered a shift toward a more integrated network topology in the theta band in both groups. Importantly, this change was significantly stronger in the dyslexic readers, who also showed increased reliance on a right frontal cluster of electrodes for word tracking. The current findings point towards an altered effect of word-level processing on the functional brain network organization that may be associated with less efficient phonological and reading skills in dyslexia.

Original languageEnglish
Article number119142
Number of pages14
JournalNeuroimage
Volume254
Early online date25 Mar 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2022

Keywords

  • CORTICAL ORGANIZATION
  • Developmental dyslexia
  • Electroencephalography (EEG)
  • Functional connectivity
  • GRAPH-THEORETICAL ANALYSIS
  • Graph theory
  • MINIMUM SPANNING TREE
  • Minimum spanning tree
  • NEURAL ENTRAINMENT
  • PERMUTATION TESTS
  • PHASE-LAG INDEX
  • RESTING-STATE
  • STATE FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY
  • Speech tracking
  • THETA OSCILLATIONS
  • WORKING-MEMORY

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Altered brain network topology during speech tracking in developmental dyslexia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this