Alcohol consumption and bladder cancer risk: results from The Netherlands Cohort Study.

M.P.A. Zeegers, A. Volovics, E. Dorant, R.A. Goldbohm, P.A. van den Brandt

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Abstract

Am J Epidemiol 2001 Jan 1;153(1):38-41 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut


Alcohol consumption and bladder cancer risk: results from The Netherlands Cohort Study.

Zeegers MP, Volovics A, Dorant E, Goldbohm RA, van den Brandt PA.

Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. mpa.zeegers@epid.unimaas.nl

Although several epidemiologic studies have been conducted on alcohol consumption and bladder cancer risk, the risk according to quantity and type of alcohol consumed is not clear. The authors investigated these associations in a large prospective cohort study on diet and cancer among 120,852 subjects in the Netherlands aged 55-69 years at baseline (1986). Subjects completed a questionnaire on risk factors for cancer, including alcohol consumption. Follow-up for incident cancer was established by record linkage to cancer registries. The case-cohort analysis was restricted to a follow-up period of 6.3 years and was based on 594 cases with bladder cancer and 3,170 subcohort members. The authors corrected for age and smoking in multivariable analyses. The incidence rate ratios for men who consumed <5, 5-<15, 15-<30, and > or =30 grams of alcohol per day were 1.49, 1.52, 1.16, and 1.63 compared with nondrinkers, respectively (p for trend = 0.13). Alcohol consumed from beer, wine, and liquor was associated with moderately elevated risks, although most were not statistically significant. The incidence rate ratios for women varied around unity. The results of this study do not suggest an important association between alcohol consumption and bladder cancer risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-41
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume153
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2001

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