Aerobic and strength exercises for youngsters aged 12 to 15: what do parents think?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although strength exercises evidently have both physiological and psychological health benefits across all ages, they are erroneously considered to adversely affect health status in youngsters. The aim of this study was to examine parental attitudes towards their child's physical activity in general, as well as aerobic and strength exercises in particular. METHODS: In total, 314 parents from an online panel representative of the Dutch population completed an online survey about their own physical activity and that of their child (12-15 years old). The study also explored reasons for non-participation, and attitudes about the parents' own and their child's physical activity level. RESULTS: Parents consistently reported a positive attitude towards aerobic exercises, but a less positive attitude regarding strength exercises. Parents were more likely to indicate that their child was not allowed to participate in strength exercises (29.6 %) than aerobic exercises (4.0 %). They thought that strength exercises could interfere with optimal physical development. CONCLUSIONS: This study consistently shows that parents have a positive attitude towards aerobic exercises, but a less positive attitude regarding strength exercises. We suggest testing interventions to increase parental understanding of the advantages of and possibilities for (e.g., facilities) strength training on their child's health.
Original languageEnglish
Article number994
Number of pages9
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2015

Keywords

  • Resistance exercise
  • Adolescents
  • Attitude
  • Parenting
  • Physical activity
  • Intervention development
  • PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
  • RESISTANCE EXERCISE
  • BODY-COMPOSITION
  • CHILDREN
  • OVERWEIGHT
  • ADOLESCENTS
  • ENVIRONMENT
  • INTENSITY
  • BENEFITS
  • PROGRAM

Cite this