Abstract

In an effort to better quantify the impact of adulthood socioeconomic circumstances on prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2DM), we set out to examine the relative importance of four adulthood socioeconomic indicators. Using cross-sectional data from The Maastricht Study on 2011 middle-aged older men and women, our findings indicate that low educational level (OR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.24-2.64), low occupational level (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 0.98-2.05), and material deprivation (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.33-2.38) were independently associated with T2DM. Low income (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.88-1.87) was the strongest, albeit not significant, SEP (socioeconomic position) correlate of prediabetes. This association confirms SEP as a multifaceted concept and indicates the need to measure SEP accordingly. In order to tackle the social gradient in prediabetes and T2DM, one should, therefore, address multiple SEP indicators and their possible pathways.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1435
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume16
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Apr 2019

Keywords

  • socioeconomic position
  • type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • prediabetes
  • epidemiology
  • SELF-RATED HEALTH
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • SOCIAL-CLASS
  • INEQUALITIES
  • INTELLIGENCE
  • INDICATORS
  • COMPLICATIONS
  • DETERMINANTS
  • PREDICTOR
  • OBESITY

Cite this

@article{ea2dbe1139114071b83411ddf4272c2f,
title = "Adulthood Socioeconomic Position and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus-A Comparison of Education, Occupation, Income, and Material Deprivation: The Maastricht Study",
abstract = "In an effort to better quantify the impact of adulthood socioeconomic circumstances on prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2DM), we set out to examine the relative importance of four adulthood socioeconomic indicators. Using cross-sectional data from The Maastricht Study on 2011 middle-aged older men and women, our findings indicate that low educational level (OR = 1.81, 95{\%} CI = 1.24-2.64), low occupational level (OR = 1.42, 95{\%} CI = 0.98-2.05), and material deprivation (OR = 1.78, 95{\%} CI = 1.33-2.38) were independently associated with T2DM. Low income (OR = 1.28, 95{\%} CI = 0.88-1.87) was the strongest, albeit not significant, SEP (socioeconomic position) correlate of prediabetes. This association confirms SEP as a multifaceted concept and indicates the need to measure SEP accordingly. In order to tackle the social gradient in prediabetes and T2DM, one should, therefore, address multiple SEP indicators and their possible pathways.",
keywords = "socioeconomic position, type 2 diabetes mellitus, prediabetes, epidemiology, SELF-RATED HEALTH, RISK-FACTORS, SOCIAL-CLASS, INEQUALITIES, INTELLIGENCE, INDICATORS, COMPLICATIONS, DETERMINANTS, PREDICTOR, OBESITY",
author = "Yuwei Qi and Annemarie Koster and {van Boxtel}, Martin and Sebastian K{\"o}hler and Miranda Schram and Nicolaas Schaper and Coen Stehouwer and Hans Bosma",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "23",
doi = "10.3390/ijerph16081435",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
journal = "International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health",
issn = "1660-4601",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adulthood Socioeconomic Position and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus-A Comparison of Education, Occupation, Income, and Material Deprivation

T2 - The Maastricht Study

AU - Qi, Yuwei

AU - Koster, Annemarie

AU - van Boxtel, Martin

AU - Köhler, Sebastian

AU - Schram, Miranda

AU - Schaper, Nicolaas

AU - Stehouwer, Coen

AU - Bosma, Hans

PY - 2019/4/23

Y1 - 2019/4/23

N2 - In an effort to better quantify the impact of adulthood socioeconomic circumstances on prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2DM), we set out to examine the relative importance of four adulthood socioeconomic indicators. Using cross-sectional data from The Maastricht Study on 2011 middle-aged older men and women, our findings indicate that low educational level (OR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.24-2.64), low occupational level (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 0.98-2.05), and material deprivation (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.33-2.38) were independently associated with T2DM. Low income (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.88-1.87) was the strongest, albeit not significant, SEP (socioeconomic position) correlate of prediabetes. This association confirms SEP as a multifaceted concept and indicates the need to measure SEP accordingly. In order to tackle the social gradient in prediabetes and T2DM, one should, therefore, address multiple SEP indicators and their possible pathways.

AB - In an effort to better quantify the impact of adulthood socioeconomic circumstances on prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2DM), we set out to examine the relative importance of four adulthood socioeconomic indicators. Using cross-sectional data from The Maastricht Study on 2011 middle-aged older men and women, our findings indicate that low educational level (OR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.24-2.64), low occupational level (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 0.98-2.05), and material deprivation (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.33-2.38) were independently associated with T2DM. Low income (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.88-1.87) was the strongest, albeit not significant, SEP (socioeconomic position) correlate of prediabetes. This association confirms SEP as a multifaceted concept and indicates the need to measure SEP accordingly. In order to tackle the social gradient in prediabetes and T2DM, one should, therefore, address multiple SEP indicators and their possible pathways.

KW - socioeconomic position

KW - type 2 diabetes mellitus

KW - prediabetes

KW - epidemiology

KW - SELF-RATED HEALTH

KW - RISK-FACTORS

KW - SOCIAL-CLASS

KW - INEQUALITIES

KW - INTELLIGENCE

KW - INDICATORS

KW - COMPLICATIONS

KW - DETERMINANTS

KW - PREDICTOR

KW - OBESITY

U2 - 10.3390/ijerph16081435

DO - 10.3390/ijerph16081435

M3 - Article

C2 - 31018480

VL - 16

JO - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

JF - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

SN - 1660-4601

IS - 8

M1 - 1435

ER -