A systematic review on economic evaluations of school-based lifestyle interventions targeting weight-related behaviours among 4-12 year olds: Issues and ways forward

Research output: Contribution to journal(Systematic) Review article peer-review

Abstract

Current guidelines for economic evaluations do not provide specific recommendations for the evaluation of school-based lifestyle interventions. This study examined and discussed the key aspects in the design of economic evaluations on school-based interventions targeting weight-related behaviours among 4-12 year olds. The PubMed and CRD databases (NHS EED) were searched. Grey literature was identified from reference lists and websites of relevant organizations. Full economic evaluations on school-based interventions targeting physical activity, sedentariness, or diet were selected. Key aspects included the objective, audience, intervention, comparator, population, type of analysis, perspective, costs, outcomes, and time horizon. Information was also extracted on measuring and valuing costs and outcomes, linking and extrapolating outcomes, and the maintenance of intervention effects. The 23 included studies reported on cost-effectiveness (CEAs) (N = 12), cost-utility (CUAs) (N = 9), social cost benefit (SCBA) (N = 2), and social return on investment (SROI) (N = 1) analysis. The usual practice comparator was generally not clearly defined. The SROI analysis was the single study that included outcomes in other persons than the child. Healthcare costs (N = 14), productivity costs (N = 4), and costs to the household (N = 3), or education (N = 2) sector were examined. The outcome in trial-based CEAs consisted of a variety of weight-related measures. Seven distinctive models were used to extrapolate health and/or productivity costs. To enhance the usefulness of economic evaluations on school-based lifestyle interventions in allocating public health budgets, transparent reporting on key aspects, broadening the scope of economic evaluations, and standardizing the measurement, valuation, and extrapolation of costs and outcomes should be improved. This study was conducted in Maastricht, the Netherlands.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-122
Number of pages8
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume114
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2018

Keywords

  • Lifestyle prevention
  • Elementary school
  • Cost effectiveness
  • Economic evaluation
  • Methods
  • ASSESSING COST-EFFECTIVENESS
  • OBESITY PREVENTION PROGRAMS
  • PROMOTE PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
  • CHILDHOOD OBESITY
  • MENTAL-HEALTH
  • CHILDREN
  • ADOLESCENTS
  • METAANALYSIS
  • ADULTHOOD
  • TRACKING

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A systematic review on economic evaluations of school-based lifestyle interventions targeting weight-related behaviours among 4-12 year olds: Issues and ways forward'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this