A single bout of strenuous exercise overcomes lipid-induced anabolic resistance to protein ingestion in overweight, middle-aged men

William J. Smiles, Tyler A. Churchward-Venne, Luc J. C. van Loon, John A. Hawley*, Donny M. Camera

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

7 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

High-circulating lipid availability attenuates protein feeding-induced muscle protein synthesis (MPS). Whether the combined effects of exercise and protein ingestion can rescue this inhibition is unknown. In a parallel-groups design, middle-aged sedentary males (n = 28) matched for fat-free mass and body mass index received a 5-h intravenous infusion of either saline/control (n = 9), 20% intralipid infusion (n = 9), or intralipid with concomitant exercise (n = 10). Two hours into each of these infusions, participants received a primed constant infusion of L-(ring-[C-13](6))-phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were taken immediately after control and lipid infusions, at which time, a 30-g protein beverage was ingested. Further biopsies were taken 2 and 4 h after protein ingestion. Intralipid increased plasma free fatty acid concentrations from similar to 0.4-2 mM, resulting in an attenuated MPS response to protein ingestion, which was prevented by exercise. Intralipid resulted in a lower peak aminoacidemia following protein ingestion that was exacerbated by prior exercise, suggesting efficiency of the working skeletal muscle to utilize amino acid substrate to drive the postprandial anabolic response. We conclude that in the face of high-fat availability, exercise preserves the sensitivity of skeletal muscle to the anabolic properties of amino acids.-Smiles, W. J., Churchward-Venne, T. A., van Loon, L. J. C., Hawley, J. A., Camera, D. M. A single bout of strenuous exercise overcomes lipid-induced anabolic resistance to protein ingestion in overweight, middle-aged men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7009-7017
Number of pages9
JournalFaseb Journal
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

Keywords

  • skeletal muscle
  • protein synthesis
  • high-fat
  • nutrition
  • sarcopenic obesity
  • HUMAN SKELETAL-MUSCLE
  • INSULIN
  • MYOFIBRILLAR
  • COINGESTION
  • BREAKDOWN
  • BASAL

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