A narrative synthesis systematic review of digital self-monitoring interventions for middle-aged and older adults

Sara Laureen Bartels*, Rosalia J. M. Van Knippenberg, Fania C. M. Dassen, Eric Asaba, Ann-Helen Patomella, Camilla Malinowsky, Frans R. J. Verhey, Marjolein E. de Vugt*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

10 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Objective: Self-monitoring is crucial to raise awareness for own behaviors and emotions, and thus facilitate self-management. The composition of self-monitoring within interventions, however, varies and guidelines are currently unavailable. This review aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of technology-based self-monitoring interventions that intend to improve health in middle-aged and older adults (> 45 years).

Methods: Five online databases were systematically searched and articles were independently screened. A narrative synthesis of 26 studies with 21 unique interventions was conducted. Primary focus lay on the composition of self-monitoring within interventions, including technology used, health-aspects monitored, and type of feedback provided. Secondly, the usability of/adherence to the self-monitoring treatment, intervention effects, and their sustainability were examined.

Findings: Studies concentrated on middle-aged adults (mean of 51 years). Mobile technologies seem necessary to ensure flexible self-monitoring in everyday life. Social health aspects were rarely monitored. Mechanisms and the sustainability of intervention effect are understudied.

Conclusion: Digital self-monitoring technologies hold promise for future trials as they seem suitable to understand and support health-related self-management. Key elements including automatic and personal feedback following the blended care principle were highlighted and may guide study designs. Prospectively, research is especially needed to study sustained self-monitoring to support disease prevention and lasting lifestyle changes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100283
Number of pages10
JournalInternet Interventions
Volume18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019
Event10th Scientific Meeting of the International-Society-for-Research-on-Internet-Interventions (ISRII) - Auckland, New Zealand
Duration: 13 Feb 201915 Feb 2019

Keywords

  • Mobile technology
  • Intervention
  • Self-monitoring
  • Momentary assessment
  • Middle-aged and older adults
  • ECOLOGICAL MOMENTARY ASSESSMENT
  • EXPERIENCE SAMPLING RESEARCH
  • BEHAVIOR-CHANGE
  • EHEALTH INTERVENTIONS
  • MOBILE-TECHNOLOGY
  • HEALTH
  • DESIGN
  • MODEL
  • TIME

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