A History of Universalism: Conceptions of the Internationality of Science (1750-1950)

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Abstract

That science is fundamentally universal has been proclaimed innumerable times. But the precise geographical meaning of this universality has changed historically. This article examines conceptions of scientific internationalism from the Enlightenment to the Cold War, and their varying relations to cosmopolitanism, nationalism, socialism, and 'the West'. These views are confronted with recent tendencies to cast science as a uniquely European product.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)361-379
JournalMinerva
Volume46
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2008

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